Algae

From WikiGarden

Algae

Algae and Cyanobacteria (blue-green algae) have traditionally been grouped together based on their ability to undertake photosynthesis in aquatic environments. Unlike land plants which evolved from a common ancestor, different lineages of algae have evolved separately in aquatic environments over the last three billion years. These different evolutionary histories are reflected in the current classification scheme which assigns ‘algal’ species to four of the six Kingdoms of Life on Earth: cyanobacteria (Bacteria), red and green algae (Plantae), euglenoids and dinoflagellates (Protozoa) and the brown algae, diatoms and several others (Chromista). Globally, there are approximately 34,000 described species of cyanobacteria and algae, but this is probably only a tenth of the species still waiting to be discovered. These organisms play an important role in aquatic ecosystems underpinning food webs including those supporting commercial fisheries, contributing to global carbon, nitrogen and sulphur cycles, stabilizing sediments to improve water quality and providing habitat for many other species.

Native plants | Environment, land and water | Queensland Government : taken from - https://www.qld.gov.au/environment/plants-animals/plants/native-plants http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/au/

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